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Tomorrow World x Black Butter Records Mix Contest – MR PUZL

My submission for TomorrowWorld x Black Butter Contest Mix.
Stacked full of some my favorite jams.

Tracklist:
1. Talking Dirty (Original Mix) – Tapesh, KANT
2. Pushing On (Original Mix) – Oliver $, Jimi Jules
3. Watching the Stars (Super Flu’s Watching a Piano Remix) – Monkey Safari
4. Something North (Original Mix) – BNRY
5. Move On Out (Original Mix) - Bontan
6. Crossing Borders Feat. Fritz Kalkbrenner (Kolombo Remix) – Booka Shade
7. I Can See feat. Ben Westbeech (Konstantin Sibold Remix) – Jazzanova, Ben Westbeech
8. Back To My House (Original Mix) – Moonwalk
9. Mascarade (Rodriguez Jr. Remix) – Felix Cage
10. Hum Hum (Tapesh Remix) – LouLou Players, Sharam Jey
11. Old’s Cool (Dayne S Remix) – Nana K.
12. One Day (Detroit Swindle Remix) -Softwar
13. Simple Minds (Wild Culture Remix) – Ivan Latyshev

#house #techhouse #mrpuzl

Enjoy!
MR PUZL

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degrade Presents: Color Series: 001 – Wilks

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LA is a wonderful melting pot for creatives and entrepreneurs looking to experiment with new ideas and concepts; a large population of them are currently broadening their scopes at “La Playa”. In the past 4-5 years a new batch of audiophiles, music aficionados, producers, visual artists and more have begun establishing a strong independent scene on the west coast. Los Angeles, in particular, has an amazing network of record labels, event companies, and boutique lifestyle brands with similar underlining goals; make music, throw parties, and most importantly, have a blast doing it. While operating as independent entities, a majority of these groups cross over and seem to go out of their way to help one another progress and build their respective followings. Case in point with degrade.

I first came across this crew after a good friend invited me to their private Facebook group. As pretentious as that may sound, I was pleasantly surprised to find out that its members were genuinely interested in sharing their individual music interests and that a lot of their tastes were auspiciously inline with mine. Furthermore, a lot of their members would often post exclusive upcoming events; sometimes happening on the same night as their own. It was this unselfish attitude that solidified my affinity for degrade. Their website speaks volumes to their eclectic selection of sounds and a color/vibe based archiving system caters to those of us that believe mainstream genre labels are insufficient in communicating how we really “feel” about the music we listen to.

To kick of the next stage in their evolution they have embarked on a monthly mix series that features one of their founding members and a rising talent in LA’s scene, Wilks (Prep School Recordings). The mix features a few of his own original sounds as well as a trademark collection of break-beating, ass-shaking, grooves guaranteed to put you in a hell of a good mood. So sit back, and enjoy “degrade.LA : 001 – Wilks [.blue]“.

*Full tracklist at the end of the post ;)

A note from the degrade crew:
“degrade.LA is an electronic music collective and event company based out of Los Angeles. The business model and spirit of the company is based around their website, a music platform where songs are categorized by color and vibe which gives users the ability to select playlists based on mood.

This month they have launched their brand new Color Series, a robust and enlightening monthly mix curated by hand selected DJ’s that embody a vibe from the degrade.LA website. The first installment kicks things off with Los Angeles native deep house producer, Wilks representing the .blue category. The track list is comprised of high energy, hypnotic dance floor tunes that take listeners straight into the late night warehouse parties that feed the underground culture of LA.

Stay tuned for more Color Series releases every month, featuring an eclectic array of fresh music from both up-and-coming and well known DJs.”

Make sure to grab the Free Download of this mix :)

Tracklist

TLC ft. Missy Elliot – Dirty Dirty (AObeats Flip)
Jaded – Gully Creeper
Worthy – Hit Me
Hannah Wants & Chris Lorenzo – Rude Boy
Kayliox vs OptionAvailable – Von Deeper
Wilks – In My System
Justin Jay – Bounce and Break
Victor Ruiz – Take A Nap (Groove Delight Bootleg)
Kaskade x Amtrac – Yep
Sage the Gemini – Gas Pedal (Motez Edit)
Iggy Azalea – Fancy (Milk N Cookies Remix)
Flexb – Baby I’m Boss
Wilks – Live Illegal
Tough Love – Love Happiness
Treasure Fingers x The Knocks – My Body (Intermodal Remix)
Disciples – Catwalk (Plastic Plates Remix)
Cajmere x Sonny Fodera – You’re the One (Pleasurekraft Remix)

Soundcloud: @degrade_LA
degrade.LA
twitter.com/degradeLA
facebook.com/degrade.LA
instagram.com/degrade_LA

Soundcloud:
twitter.com/wilksofficial
facebook.com/wilksofficial
instagram.com/wilksofficial

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Brooks and Millar – “Big Daddy” featured on Do Androids Dance

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2014 marks a huge first step for Brooks & Millar who are already supporting acts like Plastic Plates, Jerome LOL, Justin Jay and playing at venues such as Exchange LA and a quaterly residence at The Wilshire. Brooks & Millar are made up of LA based dj/producer combo Josh Brooks (aka PZB) and Jacob Millar.

Brooks saw his personal career as PZB take off in 2011 with a spot at Coachella on The Energy Factory Stage and features at LA’s premier clubs such as Avalon, Dim Mak Studios supporting acts such as Captial Cities, Cassian, Mystery Skulls and more. CBS listed him as one of LA’s Best DJs in 2012. Brooks would also go on to perform festivals such as; Brownies & Lemonade Present: Camp Trill 2012, the Venice Music Crawl 2013 and Brokechella 2013.

Millar, started making music from a very early age. In high school he began to play drums in the electronic-rock band, Blunderbear. After moving to California, Millar studied sound engineering at the Musician’s Institute in Hollywood. When he graduated, it was only a matter of time before he ran into Josh, and the two would begin their partnership.

For booking Brooks and Millar contact: lamp[at]solvethispuzl.com

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LAMP Weekly Mix #28 feat. MR PUZL

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It’s friday and we are pleased to present LAMP’s Weekly Mix #28 feat. MR PUZL to you all!

This week’s mix has a slightly different flavor to it with a few more G House style tracks and some more up tempo house tracks as well. Big shouts out to Sleepy Cat, PZB, and the whole LAMP crew, big things are happening for everyone. Today’s mix features music from an incredible arsenal of producers so make sure to check out the tracklist below.

Track List

1. Studio (Wood Holly Bootleg Remix) – Schoolboy Q
2. Under The Spell – Detroit Swindle
3. Won Ton Crystal – Jay Shepheard
4. Django – Dayne S
5. She’s Got a Big Fat Mom – Saccao, CASSIMM
6. Everyday – Vintage Culture, TheDuo
7. Engine No. 9 – DJ Dan, WhiteNoize
8. Freak Like Me feat. Bunny Sigler (DJ Dan Mix) – Prince Dred
9. Still Believe feat. Marcoradi – Gerd
10. Hypnotize – Sleepy Cat

PZB and I are heading down to Costa Mesa tomorrow night to play with our good friend Death House of Love at Memphis, click on the flyer below for more details and hopefully see some of you there.

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Also if you’re in the cool kids group come to our BBQ on Sat and listen to LAMP crew get down on decks along with a bunch of our good friends. You never know what could happen.

Enjoy,
MR PUZL

- Be sure to check out more of MR PUZL’s tunes here.

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Welcome to the world of KBANKS

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Needless to say we’re a big fan of KBANKS at PUZL (full disclosure, he is a frequent regular in our publication). This Massachusetts based illustrator has done his damage in both corporate and independent settings as an accomplished Creative Director. I first met KBANKS while working at the Boston Phoenix. He was making headway with well orchestrated art direction that tried to undermine the boring restrictive nature of its’ facilitators. It was there I came across his personal work, and was swiftly drawn into his weirdly playful environments and dark abstract characters.

ALLSTON_1997©KBANKS
EMPLOYEE_2014_©KBANKS
 

Since then we’ve continued finding ways to work together, and when possible we grab a beer and share a few tall tales. It is that the story telling element within his work that directly exposes itself to a range of interpretation and thus draws its audience deeper into the world of KBANKS.

CENTRALSQ_2014_©KBANKS
RUM_COKE_©BANKS_1998
 

I got to catch up with KBANKS over the phone last week to talk about work, life, and delve a little deeper into his past:

About a year ago, I was the Art Director at a well-known media company in Boston that suffered a slow death over a roughly 3-year period, eventually shutting down completely. I was on board for six years and for a long time I really cared about the company, especially the young people starting out and how we all inspired each other to bring our A-game, while getting the job done. As the economic downturn worsened, creativity went out the window fast, design department budgets were cut, knives plunged into backs, and all levels of staff were jumping ship on a near weekly basis never to be replaced. When the company did fold it was a bitter-sweet relief.

For many of us it was a welcome time for a new direction: I have been teaching design in a graduate program at a university downtown for three years and find it very rewarding. I landed some contract work via faculty connections and combined with my larger clients was able to upgrade the Claymore Design Group to a full time endeavor. We produce a basic collection of bread & butter advertising or marketing design for companies that need to inject fresh creative into new or existing aspects of their company. I typically have a brief conversation with the client and later in the day send an idea for the AD to work with. Ultimately I provide files that they can implement across various platforms in-house. It’s not complicated but it all happens very quickly.

Last winter about a decade after my last gallery show, I purchased a pair of glasses and started illustrating again. Maybe to see if I still could or maybe to stay busy during a very long winter? I don’t know. I definitely needed a break from the corporate PDF shooting galleries — and now find the tactile ‘analog’ approach of paper and a pencil sharpener a welcome respite from spending 60 hours a week staring at my MacBook.

I began in Boston as an illustrator many years ago before hitting the Art Director beat. It felt really good to return to that era and visual playground where the assignments and the awards stacked up fast. I was raised on a steady diet of Edward Gorey, Mad Magazine, The Clash, Ralph Steadman, and cartoons from Playboy Magazines. I studied illustration at SVA and developed an editorial style that could swing in numerous directions; I could use humor, satire, or be a wise-guy toeing the delicate line of agitation. That kind of creative freedom had been squashed for too many years in my subsequent Art Director roles. I felt like I had suddenly exited some drab art directors subway line that only travelled in wide slow circles over and over — and was finally enjoying myself again while illustrating at night and doing design by day. Coupled with the fact that I was home a lot more getting to play with my kids when I wanted, take them to school, and pitching in more with running a household. I also trimmed my social calendar drastically. Stopped ‘having drinks’ with people that bring nothing to the table and spent a few months offline to detox from Facebook.

I started going to museums again, studying classic films again and reading a lot more. Most importantly: I started connecting and collaborating with people who I wanted to work with on independent projects as opposed to the coworkers that I had to work with in my past. Granted, I learned a lot from those in-house experiences and am very excited to be putting that knowledge to use on my own projects on my own terms.

Good ideas started coming. What kind of ideas? Well, the fun stuff that I never had time for and some new revenue generators as well. Besides illustrating, freelancing for cool clients, teaching, mentoring students – I started writing again. Mainly short stories about what where very colorful times spent living in The School of Visual Arts (SVA) dorm in Manhattan circa 1985-1988. This content has become the basis for several of my new projects. The most visible being the SLOANE comics online that you can find each Friday on this PUZL site. It’s not the type of content I’d want my mother reading because these are true stories of my friends and I during our college years in NYC in the late 80s. Yes, it gets raunchy and smoke-filled, obviously. (See Q&A below for details) Let’s just say that I’m glad there was no internet in the late ‘80s for footage of these depraved shenanigans to go viral on. If there was, I’d probably still be in an upstate prison with a gray ‘80s haircut listening to Killing Joke albums.

Now for the really tough questions…

PUZL: WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON CURRENT SOCIAL MEDIA TRENDS?
KBANKS: Everything in moderation. Like many people, I’ve learned how to use it gently to market myself and remain wary of it at the same time. I find it valuable as a collaborative communications tool: Staying in touch with idea people, shooting concepts back and forth, etc. IMO, the bulk of the ‘social’ aspect stanks of illusion, fiction, and recycled drama. Note: If you read social media as if it were a big city newspaper circa 1950s – it makes a lot more sense. Try it.

PUZL: TALK A LITTLE ABOUT SLOANE, ITS ROOTS, AND LIVING IN MANHATTAN IN THE 80S.
KBANKS: I moved in at 19 and spent three years living in ‘Sloane House’ which was a 15-story YMCA located on 34th & 9th Ave in NYC. Schools in the area would house students there and call it their ‘dorm.’ SVA had floors 8, 9, and 10. Parsons had 6 and 7, and F.I.T had a few floors. I remember being told that the only rule was that they didn’t allow fighting. You could do… What. Ever. You. Wanted. But just don’t fight or you would be evicted. It should be mentioned that the rooms were very small and everybody had their own 7×10 foot room, adding to the level of intimacy and drama. No surprise that the parties were non-stop and live bands could play in the hallways or function rooms on the second floor. Smoking weed in the lobby was called a ‘social club’ and throwing large objects out of the windows on to parked cars on 33rd street was a sport. When it was warm we would party all night and pass-out on the roof like cats.

The school was located over on the East Side and it felt very much like they didn’t want to know what went on at the dorm: With hundreds and hundreds of young, broke, art students living in the small quarters of a post-punk chamber of sex & drugs. It all got weird pretty fast but we liked it that way. Each floor smelled completely different and a bit rancid. Most notably: the 5th floor was housing for transients and section 8 elderly citizens. They would sometimes die in their rooms and it took a while for them to be removed. Sometimes we would spot one being wheeled off the elevator and out the lobby side door. Security had a code: a dead body was referred to as a “Vincent van Gogh.”

NYC in the ‘80s was a filthy, slutty, dangerous, hilarious, and drug-addled urban addiction — I loved it. I’m using these themes to tell stories of the Sloane dorm experience through the eyes of a 19-year old from the suburbs of Boston living in a city for the first time with a collection of art-school delinquents. The Sloane series is a dingy and sloppy Photoshop production, and the hook is that all of the events depicted actually happened. I’m in touch with a handful of people that also lived in Sloane, so I can mine additional perspectives and recollections of notable events to write about.

PUZL: WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST SHOW? ARE YOU PLANNING TO PUT THE NEW ILLUSTRATION WORK IN A SHOW?
KBANKS: The first solo exhibit I ever had was in a dive bar called DELUX in Boston’s South End. I think it was 1996. It was so much fun that I had three more shows there. It was a dark, boozy, music-themed dive, so I started creating small (10-piece) series of artwork that would look at home on the wall of a smoky bar. The owner and bartender would sell the originals right off the wall to customers. I would go in every few weeks, have a R&C and collect an envelope of cash. Weeks before a show I would write a super-serious press release and send it to every media outlet in town. I kind of buried the fact that the venue was a bar and not a gallery. Thankfully, the editors at the Boston Phoenix and Boston Globe were always very generous about my press. This in turn assured a packed ‘opening’ night, and the bar sold a ton of drinks on a slow night. Everybody wins. Short answer: I’m looking for another dive bar to do this again.

PUZL: 4. IF YOU COULD HAVE DINNER AND DRINKS WITH ANY ARTIST, LIVING OR DEAD — WHO WOULD THAT BE?
KBANKS: Ah, the living one.

Stay tuned weekly on Friday’s for the latest edition of “Sloane” by KBANKS
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CLAYMORE: http://claymoregoboom.com
KBANKS: http://kbanks.bigcartel.com

Enjoy,
MR PUZL